Aging - Athletes
Better Practices, Better Results
                                                            
                                                          Competition

 

Happiness and the Aging Athlete



Attaining happiness in retirement for an aging athlete can be a bit more complicated than for a non athletes. This is due to the fact that all Aging Athletes need ongoing competition to be happy. Whether competing with one’s self by increasing the number of reps one completes or competing against others in games and sports, the Aging Athlete must continue to compete to find true happiness. Card and board games, computer games, pool, ping pong can help but an Aging Athlete typically needs more than that.

Adventure, Challenges, and Organized Events



Have you ever wanted to go one on one with Michael Jordan? Then Fantasy Camps might just be the ticket. You don't have to stick to one sport either as is the case with the Ultimate Fantasy Camp summarized below. Whether attending an NCCA tournament and hooping it up with your buddies 24/7 in a private gym or swimming across the Straight of Gilbralter like my 40 something buddy in Spain.
 


Photo By Tom Servais


Whether surfing big waves from a yacht in Indonesia like my 60 something buddy, Heli snow-skiing like my 50 something buddy or playing Soccer in various tournaments like my 40 something buddy, perhaps for you it's daily
extreme bike riding like my 50 something buddy or rock climbing like my 40 something buddy. Maybe you'll compete in the Senior Olympics and or Masters Games or something much less tame, it's all good for the aging athlete. For the aging athlete to compete is to live, to live is to compete.





One Example:

The Ultimate Fantasy Sports Camp is for men and women of all ages. Teams of all men, all women, or a combination of the two can be created to make your experience everything that you hope it to be. The Ultimate Fantasy Sports Camp is perfect for individual groups of friends, company retreats, fraternity or sorority functions and any other group who wants to experience the fun, excitement and camaraderie of playing organized team sports in a competitive, yet friendly environment.

Our mission is to provide an experience of a lifetime where adults can relive their youth in a camp-like atmosphere and participate in sports competitions and contests designed to exceed their every expectation. Skill level and experience do not matter as each camp can be designed to make the experience rewarding for all.

To book a tournament at the Ultimate Fantasy Sports Camp, the customer must provide a minimum of 40 players. Then, four teams of 10 – 12 players are formed to compete in multiple sports and challenges each day, for three days, where their physical and mental endurance, teamwork and strategy are put to the test. The participants compete as teams in a combination of the following sports and events:

Flag Football
Softball
Volleyball
Golf
Dodge Ball


Basketball
Soccer
Ultimate Frisbee
Archery
Obstacle Course

Street Hockey
Tennis
Swimming
Track and Field
Ping Pong

The Ultimate Fantasy Sports Camp is unlike any other sports “fantasy camp” offered to the public. Most adult fantasy camps offer one sport that is played over and over again, such as basketball or baseball. Participants at the Ultimate Fantasy Sports Camp can compete in up to fifteen different sports and competitions, all at a self-contained sports complex facility.

How do I Sign Up for the Ultimate Fantasy Sports Camp?

For more information or to participate in the Ultimate Fantasy Sports Camp, please e-mail us at Info@ultimatefantasysportscamp.com or call us at (661) 724-9184 Ext. 227.  

This is a partial  list of notable people who have participated in Masters Athletics. Most have achieved their primary notoriety through athletic endeavors except when noted.

INTRODUCTION

Aging -athletes profiles are intended to inspire as well as educate readers on exactly how each individual handles athletic activities as they age. Just as no one tree is exactly the same as another in the forest, no two people are exactly the same in the world of Aging Athletics. These profiles serve as a point of reference or perhaps simple confirmation of the fact that there is a right way to do things.

Adopting better practices will provide one with better results. I'm always interested in hearing from folks regarding their approach to being an Aging-Athlete. No one answer fits all. Together the sum of all our individual answers are more powerful than any one approach to fitness. 

I look forward to hearing from you or your referral to someone you think would be interesting. Please use the contact form in the column on the right.


David Jenkins & Daughter Julia 

    40 + AGING - ATHLETE PROFILE

David Jenkins of Encinitas, California surfs southern California most everyday. His surfing travels include Hawaii, Fiji, Tahiti, New Zealand, Australia, Mentawais, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, mainland Mexico, and Baja California. David is a true “Waterman” having been a Lifeguard since his early 20’s. David was featured in a full page spread in Sports Illustrated Magazine surfing Southern California. He’s had his share of injuries including a severely cut leg and a potentially career ending back injury which were both deadly serious. David came back from both injuries with flying colors.

Besides being a world class surfer David is also an exceptional Soccer player. A long time Encinitas “Surf” team member David also played Soccer in college making the team as a walk – on. Today David still plays on his soccer team “Surf” and has his own private Soccer Arena where he often plays with local super stars. David also enjoys skateboarding, snowboarding, and rock climbing.

David’s keys to his success are his flexibility and over-all fitness. He is at the early stages of being an aging - athlete and consequently doesn’t really need to do something to do something else. In other words he doesn't need to go to the gym, or do back exercises, Pilates, Core Training or even deep stretching in order to:

Catch the best/biggest wave of the day

Score a goal

Save someone from drowning

Perform tricks on the skate ramp

Drop in on the Cornice at Mammoth Mountain Ski Resort

Climb to the top of a peak in Joshua Tree National Park

Whenever the opportunity presents itself……….

Basic stretching and continuous exercise at high performance levels are keeping him in tip top shape. David does what he does because it is fun. It’s also helpful in managing the daily stresses of life. David stays so active that he’s defying gravity and the universe by never slowing down enough to feel his age. Oh how sweet it is!

                               UPCOMING COMPETITIVE EVENTS





WORLD MASTERS GAMES

Summer Games

2013 Torino, Italy 

2015 Sestriere-Pragelato-Torino, Italy

Winter Games

2017
Auckland, New Zealand


NATIONAL SENIOR GAMES REPORT

CHECK THIS OUT!

http://www.cbsnews.com/2300-204_162-10008936-2.html

Link to Report From National Senior Games, aging athletes compete in everything from swimming and track & field to softball, bowling and badminton. Great photos!




CHARGING IT HARD!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8roXwZKpTts
This Video Really Brings It Home!



FANTASY CAMPS



ADVENTURES - Check out National Geographics "Best Adventure Travel Companies on the Planet"

http://adventure.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/outfitterhome



CHALLENGES



ORGANIZED EVENTS - Check out Festivals and Events By country at
http://thecheaproute.com/events-around-the-world.html



Former U.S. Olympic coach Payton Jordan of California sets a world record (30.89 seconds) in the M80 age group in the 200-meter dash at the USATF National Masters Championships in 1997 in San Jose, California

The National Senior Games or "Senior Olympics" is a sports competition for seniors from the United States. It is a multi-sport event specifically devoted to adults aged 50+ (events are divided into age groups with five years interval). It is composed of regional competitions held yearly in all American states. Every two years a nationwide event is held in one state (the National Senior Olympics).

World Masters Athletics—WMA is the worldwide governing body for Masters athletics. It provides a global standard of rule modifications (based upon the international rules for the sport created by the IAAF) for athletes of a certain age. Each individual country governs its own affairs with an organizational governing body that is an affiliate to WMA.

The World Association of Veteran Athletes was founded August 9, 1977, at the second World Masters Athletics Championships in Gothenburg, Sweden. World masters championships have been held outdoors every two years ever since, and a biennial World Masters Indoor Championships debuted in March 2004 in Sindelfingen, Germany. The most recent outdoor world meet was in 2011 in Sacramento, California. The most recent Indoor Championships were held in Jyväskylä, Finland in April 2012.

WAVA, as it was known, later changed its name to World Masters Athletics and continues to be the sport's governing body. WMA has been working to coordinate its outdoor championship schedule with the International Masters Games Association, which holds the multisport World Masters Games every four years.

Summer Games

2013
Torino, Italy

2015
Sestriere-Pragelato-Torino, Italy

Winter Games

2017
Auckland, New Zealand

If you are age 50 or older and want to compete in Olympic sports, the nonprofit National Senior Games Association (NSGA), a member of the U.S. Olympics Committee, organizes just the thing for you and all fit men and women your age: the Senior Olympics. You can compete year-round in individual and team sports at the state level and try to qualify for the biennial Summer National Senior Games. Several states also stage Winter Games. Let your games begin by entering a state-level Senior Games event.

Read more: How to compete in Senior Olympics | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_6568514_compete-senior-olympics.html#ixzz2Dnyqsy9P

Contact Us

Do You Know An Aging - Athlete? Please Refer Us To Someone Interesting!

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    50 + AGING ATHLETE PROFILE

Kent Smith of Hermosa Beach (Los Angeles) California works out every other day. A former boxer and High School jock Kent is now into training. Kent works out every other day. He typically bikes and runs cement stairs in the morning and then runs in the sand (reduces pounding from pavement) in the late afternoon. He enjoys Pilates, push-ups, weight lifting, handball and he is now getting into Yoga.

Kent’s keys to success are eating healthy, listening to his body thus helping avoid injuries, mastering come-backs, and allowing for much needed recovery time. His significant other Donna also trains with him. He is an aging – athlete that understands he really does need to do something to do something else.

Like all aging – athletes Kent recognizes the genuine need to compete to be truly happy. Kent has no plans to enter the Masters Games or run in a Marathon. Kent chooses to compete with himself. He constantly pushes himself to do more than yesterday and fully recover in the same amount of time as he did the day before.

Kent’s motivation is he wants to feel good and be prepared at a moments notice for anything life throws his way. Like a Navy Seal he trains to be ready. He sets fitness goals in order to over come the mental and physical challenges of life. Developing challenging training routines and competing with himself everyday, Kent has discovered perhaps even created his own personal fountain of youth.

For Kent it is a matter of priorities. His health and state of fitness are # 1 period.


 John Batliner indulges in a siesta after epic surf session
   
 60 + AGING ATHLETE PROFILE

John Batliner of Encinitas, California surfs southern California every other day. His surfing travels include Hawaii, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, Mentawais, and Baja California. John also enjoys skiing, biking, and tennis. John is exceptionally fit. He’s had his share of injuries including a potentially career ending back injury and knee injury which were both deadly serious. John came back from both injuries with flying colors.

John is an aging – athlete that understands he must do something to do something else. He used to do 200 stomach crunches every morning at dawn just to get through the days activities. Now he does back exercises instead which produce the same results. He eats healthy and does plenty of deep stretching, jacuzzing, and meditating on his recovery day.

John’s keys to success are discipline, knowledge, and an unrelenting desire to be active. John came to surfing relatively late as an aging athlete goes and still managed to master the sport. Today he actually rides big waves on a tow – in board pulled by a jet ski. Frankly this is unheard of for surfers of my era. He reads, talks to others, and continuously figures out what it is he should be doing to be fit. John helps satisfy his competitive itch by regularly playing in poker tournaments.

John’s motivation is the experience. Process not product. The Zen or basic connection to nature, that is what fuels him. For John what really matters is being a part of the flow of energy, experiencing the feelings associated with a bottom turn, weight-less-ness, sunshine, salt, smell of surf wax, the cries of seagulls in the air. It’s the anticipation and familiarity of the dawn patrol surf check, the glass - off at sunset, a new board’s ride, hoots and hollers shared with friends and family.

It all about being there; in the flow of energy. John has mastered the science of fitness ensuring he’ll always be able to; be out there.


 
                                                                                   
Balance - Balance is key for 40+ athletes because it impacts so many athletic endeavors. It also enhances one’s rhythm which helps one to better get into the flow of life. Finally it helps prevent falling the number one enemy of the 40+ athlete.

Exercise - Exercise resulting in physical conditioning (staying in shape) is “core” for the 40+ athlete. Good decisions regarding types and durations of exercise are often times the difference between failure and success.

Energy - Energy is central to a 40+ athletes because one needs to stay active daily. As one gets older energy seems to be in shorter supply and one benefits from healthy ways of increasing it.

Rest - Rest and rehabilitation (making comebacks) are often times the least understood and underestimated factors in the longevity of the 40+ athlete.
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